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Gil Scott Heron "The revolution won't be televised" (1970) and after

 
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PostPosted: Fri 12 Dec - 22:06 (2008)    Post subject: Gil Scott Heron "The revolution won't be televised" (1970) and after Reply with quote

The revolution will not be televised is a poem from Scott Heron which first appeared in 1970 with his album Small Talk at 125th and Lenox, on which he recited the piece, accompanied only by congas and bongo drums.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Revolution_Will_Not_Be_Televised
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Small_Talk_at_125th_and_Lenox
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gil_Scott-Heron

Someone consider that this very popular and international song from these years has inspired a politic succession in poetry such as Television the Drug of the Nation (1992) by the Disposable Heroes of Hiphoprisy.

Actually it looks like impossible to find this song through the free public aggregators of video (a new copyright has appeared and make get out the clip from Youtube but an album reviewing mostly hits from this author -still alive -is sold on amazon).

But here
http://1mc.us/blog/podcasts/2007/02/19/therevolutionwillnotbetelevised/
is a MP3
( http://www.1mc.us/media/podcasts/The Revolution Will Not Be Televised Podca… )
which contains:
01 Legacy by Non Phixion
02 Party & BUllshit by Notorious BIG
03 When The Revolution Comes by The Last Poets
04 The 6th Sense by Common
05 The Revolution Will Not Be Televised by Gil Scott-Heron
06 Jazz Cats Pt. 1 by Quasimoto
07 Space Is The Place by Sun Ra
08 The Beginning by Soul Position
09 No Gimmicks by Soul Position
10 Chained & Bound by Otis Redding
11 California Dreamin’ by Eddie Hazel

Note the reappearance of The revolution will not be televised in the movie from the Canadian Director Norman Jewison, The Hurricane (1999) --eponym title of the Bob Dylan's dedicated song from his album Desire in 1976 --on the boxer Rubin "Hurricane" Carter having spent twenty years in prison for a triple murder in June of 1966 that he would probably have not acted -starring Denzel Washington.

The Hurricane -- the movie trailer

 http://www.youtube.com/user/kbdffan

 Bob Dylan created the song as activist contribution to ask the freedom for Rubin Carter.

Hurricane --with Lyrics in subtitles

 http://www.youtube.com/user/sergiocamara
       
       

 http://www.youtube.com/user/BJA1990

     
     
     
     



http://www.globaldarkness.com/articles/gill_scott_heron_revolution_willnotb…

  Gill Scott Heron
The Revolution Will Not Be Televised   
    

       
At 49, Gil Scott-Heron stands as a towering figure of black popular music. With a masters in creative writing from Johns Hopkins, the writer, poet, composer, pianist, and modern-day griot is a true artist in an industry lacking true artistry.        
Scott-Heron emerged in the early 1970s with albums such as What’s Going On and There’s A Riot Goin’ On. By 1970, there was a profound shift in the struggle for equality as the fight for civil rights gave way to the demand for Black Power. The Civil Rights Movement had lost its focus, being ripped apart by differing interest groups and ignored by a wartime US government. The voices of its leaders were silenced by jail or bullets.        
Black popular music reflected this change. The voices on the radio stopped preaching brotherhood and togetherness and started reporting the facts, and the music got more aggressive. Leading the new attack was a new voice: articulate, uncompromising, and enraged. The voice held the light up to the country’s missteps and shook up an apathetic audience. The voice was Gil Scott-Heron’s. Scott-Heron was born in Chicago in 1949. He grew up in Lincoln, Tennessee and later the Chelsea neighborhood of the Bronx.
       

       
 
     As a student, he admired the poetry of Langston Hughes and followed his footsteps by enrolling in Lincoln University. By age 20, he completed the novel The Vulture and the book of poetry, Small Talk At 125th & Lenox. The Vulture was an auspicious beginning, heralded by Essence as "a strong start for a writer with important things to say." In the 1970’s, Scott-Heron hooked up with Flying Dutchman records to produce several important albums including Pieces of Man and Free Will.  
During the 1980s, for Arista label, Scott-Heron released twelve albums. Then, after a twelve-year break, he signed with TVT Records and released Spirits in 1993. The first cut of this album, "Message To The Messenger," is a warning to today’s rappers, urging them to take responsibility in their art and in their communities. Since then, he has played to sell-out crowds all over the world, performing at major festivals in England and the United States, including New York’s Central Park.       
  
       
The revolution will no be televised  
       
You will not be able to stay home, brother.
You will not be able to plug in, turn on and cop out.
You will not be able to lose yourself on skag and skip,
Skip out for beer during commercials,
Because the revolution will not be televised.
       
The revolution will not be televised.
The revolution will not be brought to you by Xerox
In 4 parts without commercial interruptions.
The revolution will not show you pictures of Nixon
blowing a bugle and leading a charge by John
Mitchell, General Abrams and Spiro Agnew to eat
hog maws confiscated from a Harlem sanctuary.
       
The revolution will not be televised.
The revolution will not be brought to you by the
Schaefer Award Theatre and will not star Natalie
Woods and Steve McQueen or Bullwinkle and Julia.
The revolution will not give your mouth sex appeal.
The revolution will not get rid of the nubs.
The revolution will not make you look five pounds
thinner, because the revolution will not be televised, Brother.   
  
    
There will be no pictures of you and Willie May
pushing that shopping cart down the block on the dead run,
or trying to slide that color television into a stolen ambulance.
NBC will not be able predict the winner at 8:32
or report from 29 districts.
The revolution will not be televised.
       
There will be no pictures of pigs shooting down
brothers in the instant replay.
There will be no pictures of pigs shooting down
brothers in the instant replay.
There will be no pictures of Whitney Young being
run out of Harlem on a rail with a brand new process.
There will be no slow motion or still life of Roy
Wilkens strolling through Watts in a Red, Black and
Green liberation jumpsuit that he had been saving
For just the proper occasion.
       
Green Acres, The Beverly Hillbillies, and Hooterville
Junction will no longer be so damned relevant, and
women will not care if Dick finally gets down with
Jane on Search for Tomorrow because Black people
will be in the street looking for a brighter day.
The revolution will not be televised.       

    
There will be no highlights on the eleven o'clock
news and no pictures of hairy armed women
liberationists and Jackie Onassis blowing her nose.
The theme song will not be written by Jim Webb,
Francis Scott Key, nor sung by Glen Campbell, Tom
Jones, Johnny Cash, Englebert Humperdink, or the Rare Earth.
The revolution will not be televised.   
 
    
The revolution will not be right back
after a message about a white tornado, white lightning, or white people.
You will not have to worry about a dove in your
bedroom, a tiger in your tank, or the giant in your toilet bowl.
The revolution will not go better with Coke.
The revolution will not fight the germs that may cause bad breath.
The revolution will put you in the driver's seat.   
  
    
The revolution will not be televised, will not be televised,
will not be televised, will not be televised.
The revolution will be no re-run brothers;
The revolution will be live.
       

       
Discography

SMALL TALK AT 125TH & LENOX AVE. 1970 Flying Dutchman
PIECES OF A MAN 1971 Flying Dutchman
FREE WILL 1972 Flying Dutchman
WINTER IN AMERICA 1974 Strata-East
THE REVOLUTION WILL NOT BE TELEVISED 1974 Flying Dutchman
THE FIRST MINUTE OF A NEW DAY - THE MIDNIGHT BAND 1975 Arista
FROM SOUTH AFRICA TO SOUTH CAROLINA 1975 Arista
IT'S YOUR WORLD - LIVE 1976 Arista BRIDGES 1977 Arista
SECRETS 1978 Arista
THE MIND OF GIL SCOTT- HERON 1979 Arista
1980 1980 Arista
REAL EYES 1980 Arista
REFLECTIONS 1981 Arista
MOVING TARGET 1982 Arista
THE BEST OF GIL SCOTT-HERON 1984 Arista
TALES OF GIL SCOTT-HERON and HIS AMNESIA EXPRESS 1990 Peak Top
GLORY - THE GIL SCOTT-HERON COLLECTION 1990 Arista
MINISTER OF INFORMATION 1994 Peak Top
SPIRITS 1994 TVT Records
THE GIL SCOTT-HERON COLLECTION SAMPLER : 1974-1975 1998 TVT Records
Evolution (and Flashback) The Very Best of Gil Scott-Heron 1999 BMG Music       

       

       
RELATED
The Revolution will not be televised
Talk The Talk, Walk The Walk
Word Up Root Down
More info: http://www.gilscottheron.com/       
Top | BACK TO LIST | Compiled 1999-2005 GLOBAL DARKNESS        
Disclaimer: www.globaldarkness.com is a non-commercial website and is not affiliated with any commercial organisation. This site is here for informational purposes only. In doubt of any copyright claim, please contact us and we'll remove your Intellectual Property Issues.




http://www.globaldarkness.com/articles/gil_scott_heron_talk_the_talk.htm

Talk The Talk, Walk The Walk, Gil Scott-Heron       
Fri, January 26, 2001 Jacquelyn Pope - Sonicnet


Gil Scott-Heron, proto-rapper and pianist, prime influence on hip-hop, creates a synthesis of soul, jazz and poetry that is quite unlike anything else around. Invigorated by righteous anger and biting wit, his recordings have lost none of their vividness or urgency over the 30 years he's been making them. The first releases in a planned series of reissues from TVT offer proof (if any was needed) of his enduring power- and how the more things change, the more they stay the same.
It's Your World, originally released in November 1976, was recorded (mostly) live in Boston, smack dab in the middle of that year's Bicentennial hoopla (four songs were recorded in New York), and features Scott-Heron's regular backing ensemble, the Midnight Band: longtime collaborator Brian Jackson (piano and synthesizer), Victor Brown (vocals), Danny Bowens (bass), Bilal Sunni-Ali (tenor sax, flute), Delbert Taylor (trumpet), Barnett Williams (congas), Reggie Brisbane (drums, percussion) and Tony Duncanson (congas, bongos, and timbales). The album is organized around five spans of a day's time: its songs are divided into groups called "Just Before Sundown," "Nightfall," "Late Evening" and "Midnight and Morning," and the album's moods progress according to these themes. "Sundown" features the upbeat, Jackson-penned title track and the bluesy "Possum Slim," which features a growling Scott-Heron ("The brother took all he could/ His story don't prove that he ain't no good") over Sunni-Ali's sinuous sax and Jackson's smoky synthesizer. "Nightfall"'s "New York City" is more subdued, the ragged edges of Heron's voice infusing it with tenderness: "It's home to both tramp and artist/ And dreamers from everywhere/ But most of all kindhearted people/ Whose stories ain't on the air."


The "Late Evening" tracks begin with "Home Is Where the Hatred Is," an extended jam from a junkie's point of view ("Home is where the needle marks/ Tried to heal my broken heart"). "Bicentennial Blues" , a powerful spoken-word performance, winds downs the "Late Evening" section, reminding us that "The blues remembers everything the country forgot." "Midnight" opens with "The Bottle" , a late-'70s R&B hit that features percussionists Williams and Duncanson. Their extended jam shakes out into the fresh, hopeful sound of the Brown-sung final track, "Sharing."


Also just released is The Mind of Gil Scott-Heron, a fine collection of some of his most notable spoken-word performances, including 1973's "H2O Gate Blues" ("America! The international Jekyll and Hyde") and '74's "We Beg Your Pardon (Pardon Our Analysis)," a searing indictment of Gerald Ford's pardon of Richard Nixon ("We beg your pardon/Because the pardon you gave/ Was not yours to give"). "The Ghetto Code (Dot Dot Dit Dot Dit Dot Dot Dash)," a blisteringly funny 1978 riff on conspiracy and resistance, uses the Morse code motif to great rhythmic effect, as it stays in your head, circulating as easily as any catchy musical refrain. And 1990's "Space Shuttle," directed at the waste of the space program and originally a U.K.-only release, shows that Gil Scott-Heron's moral outcries remain as riveting, and as on-target, as ever.


Article retrieved from - http://excite.vh1.com/music/mtv_editorials/1438534


RELATED
The Revolution will not be televised
Word Up Root Down

Top | BACK TO LIST | Compiled 1999-2005 GLOBAL DARKNESS        
Disclaimer: www.globaldarkness.com is a non-commercial website and is not affiliated with any commercial organisation. This site is here for informational purposes only. In doubt of any copyright claim, please contact us and we'll remove your Intellectual Property Issues.

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PostPosted: Fri 12 Dec - 23:45 (2008)    Post subject: Gill Scott Heron in 1990 till nowaday Reply with quote

The bottle

 

http://www.youtube.com/user/superteedee


Is that Jazz?

 

http://www.youtube.com/user/SocaSeven


We almost lost Detroit

 

http://www.youtube.com/user/sirnoze


Gil Scott-Heron | Winter in America
"Gil Scott-Heron and his Amnesia Express from March 14, 1990 in London, UK. "

 

http://www.youtube.com/user/sirnoze 
 

http://www.observer.com/mobile/article/80200
How he can influence our days in musics far from the message from the seventies :
Lowest Common Denominator

by J. Gabriel Boylan on December 12, 2008

Common started his rap career as a Midwestern representative of all that made mid-'90s indie hip-hop so great. Soul- and funk-driven beats were matched by confessional, verbose rhymes that eschewed rims and strippers for more pressing, mature, and human concerns. He has spent the last decade slowly augmenting that image, adding a dash of hippie here, a smattering of black nationalist there, and musically rolling through soul's many incarnations, from psychedelic to '80s boogie.

What he managed to carve out was a role as a feel-good, socially conscious, new age rapper. His sensitivity occasionally verged on wussified, but ever-present was a realist soberness, concern for the squalor, troubled times, and hard lives of America's black underclass.

His latest, Universal Mind Control, out this week, has dropped the positivity in favor of a collection of bubbly, floor-filling beat surrenders revolving mostly around sexual conquest and macho posturing. Originally scheduled for release this past June, the album was pushed because of Common's acting obligations. While his dramatic roles thus far have been commendable (his Gap commercial notwithstanding), they've clearly sapped his will to make his music anything but dippy fun. It's not just weird to stop caring about struggle, challenge, resistance, and people, and focus on partying, sex, and decadence at this particular moment. It's actually kind of obscene. And it's maybe even stranger that this material was meant as a summer album, since this summer wasn't exactly without anxiety over the future of the country.

The first line Common drops is "This is / that automatic," and it's an appropriate intro to the title track, which blandly apes '80s electro (Newcleus, Afrika Bambaataa) from the vocoded chorus to the Kraftwerk-ish central synth line. Common's development has always sounded like a half-understood journey through a friend's really great record collection (say, ?uestlove's?), jumping from Sly & the Family Stone to Gil Scott Heron without necessarily digesting the substance so much as the style. Now it's the icy realms of black futurist electro, except in place of extra-terrestrial apocalypse, we get lame come-ons and brags that feel like put-ons.

Kanye West provided beats for most of the tracks on Common's last two albums, 2005's Be and 2007's Finding Forever, and despite his recent turn to Autotuned R&B, Mr. West actually filled those albums with raw, propulsive soul and funk sounds. Pharrell Williams and The Neptunes are at the helm for seven out of the 10 songs here (with contributions from Mr. DJ and Mr. West too), and the result is decidedly less organic, with those needed touches of soul, funk, and boogie edged out by techy, minimal beats.

Along with the ill-fitting backing, Common ranges over a bunch of genre raps he's obviously uncomfortable with, if not actually just bad at. From the bogus beefy boasts of horn-led "Gladiator" to the boudoir blech of "Punch Drunk Love" (alongside Mr. West), Common feels out of his element playing the tough guy or the jaded, sex-crazed player. When Cee-Lo shows up, on "Make My Day," the fickleness of Common's project is put into relief. Cee-Lo has been remarkably consistent in his approach and the employment of his vocal and lyrical force, through Goodie Mob to his solo career and through Gnarls Barkley. And even here, he manages a bright, gospel-tinged soul strut even as a guest star, while still masking darker emotional depth within his breezy smiling lines.

Wastes of time include the achingly flaccid electro-funk of "Sex 4 Sugar," which nods to the Jungle Brothers as it rips the group off, poorly, and the Biggie-ish "Announcement," where Common rhymes about his endorsement deals, explaining "Now we can push more whips / than slavery." Oof. Later he addresses being labeled "a philosopher" by "broads" and responds "yeah, I philosophize on top of ya!" Other tracks offer similar kind of karaoke flows (Sugar Hill Gang on "What a World").

The tracks that feel most like Common's past are the forgettable "Inhale" and, just before it, the drippy "Changes," which is also the only song addressing Barack Obama's presidential campaign, and was obviously, awkwardly written before his victory (odd for such a vocal supporter of the president-elect, and reportedly one of Obama's favorite artists). Yet vague assertions like "Life is in front of you / no need to look back again / victory can be claimed / while you're still battlin' " seem like a kind of "just playin', I'm really not a club-hopping jerk" mea culpa for the lazy brainlessness of the rest of the album, and are too little, too late. By the time we've reached the end of Universal Mind Control it literally feels like someone else's album. "Everywhere," a collaboration with Brit songstress Martina Topley-Bird, is a fast, synthy club track, and would actually sound much better if you just took out Common's lame couple of verses.




Gil Scott Heron - Message to the Messengers

      


http://www.youtube.com/user/Blqlite



MySpace.com - Gil Scott-Heron - CHICAGO, Illinois - A'cappella ...
http://profile.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=user.viewProfile&friend…
--where you can hear a renewal version from "The revolution will not be televised"
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PostPosted: Sun 14 Dec - 02:55 (2008)    Post subject: Gil Scott Heron "The revolution won't be televised" (1970) and after Reply with quote

Epilogue

Marquise Porter, Rap, Detroit
"We almost lost Detroit"



http://www.youtube.com/user/TheChosenOne313
TheChosenOne313 notes this info (having himself created the video?)

The Statistics/Quotes:

- Shootings in Detroit soar in '04. More than 800 people have been gunned down.

- Detroiters fed up with gun violence attend prosecutor's forum, and agree it's up to people themselves to stop killings.

- "We have our own war over here, we don't have to go to Iraq"

- Detroit has the highest amount of Abandoned homes and business's in the country to date.

- Detroit lost 36,300 jobs this year, more than any other U.S. city, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

- "Over the years, I have gone to more funerals than graduations."

- Detroit is the poorest metropolitian city of USA. and has seen a 26 percent population decline since 1980.

- Detroit dosen't even have ONE nationwide grocery chain operating within city limits.

- "One major area is conflict resolution. People too readily pull out guns to settle arguments"

*Most Sources and Quotes we're either from The Detroit News, CNN.com, VisitDetroit.com or another website. None of the Sources/Quotes we're writen by the author of the video.

*Most (If not all) Images are Courtesy of Metro Detroit area Flickr.com users (http://www.flickr.com/photos/carrieburn ett/sets/72157600088249613/)

Note: To All The Haters, I'm Not Doing This To Put Down My City, I Love My City, I'm Just Showing How Far We Have Came From The Struggle In The Streets That We Still Continue To Live In.


Detroit Riots on July 23 of 1967
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r2_VX2nymRs




Gil Scott Heron, "Beginnings (The First Minute of a New Day)"

http://www.youtube.com/user/gcalixto
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PostPosted: Sun 14 Dec - 03:25 (2008)    Post subject: Gil Scott Heron "The revolution won't be televised" (1970) and after Reply with quote

If we follow Gil Scott Heron's Poetry and his Music we follow the emergent struggles against the Poverty and against the Racism in the postmodern USA through the cultural and social tendencies of the Black Musics crossing his time (of which he practiced all). But at last: Blues and Jazz.

He invented the activist concept of "edutainment", hacking with educational messages from music of entertainment such as the Soul, the Funk and the Disco. Something which integrates all the musics from the Black American Culture till the Hip Hop and the UK Trip Hop in the nineties and then joining to the contemporary Jazz as mixed musical culture.

In 2000 he came in Paris with his Band "Amnesia Express" @ The New Morning Room that was recorded  with an Interview by Arte TV - German/French -- for the serial Broadcast "Tracks" on the Musical Live News. Then he came back several times in the same place for magnifiscent performances among which one of the most famous issues having a lately released DVD edition (2007).

The FBI has politically broken him from questions of drugs and G. S-H. deeply affected by all these years of harassing whatever is still in a great working.
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PostPosted: Mon 15 Dec - 15:27 (2008)    Post subject: Gil Scott Heron "The revolution won't be televised" (1970) and after Reply with quote

http://www.answers.com/topic/gil-scott-heron-the-paris-concert

Movies: Gil Scott-Heron: The Paris Concert


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DVD Release
  • Release Date: 2007


Plot Afro-centric soul singer Gil Scott-Heron and his band Amnesia Express take the stage of Paris' New Morning venue with his band to offer a memorable performance and cameras roll to capture every historical moment. Initially rising to fame for his inspired use of author Langston Hughes' prose, Scott-Heron later combined poetic lyrics with unmistakable politics to protest the reprehensible treatment of African Americans in 1960s-era America. An inspiration to generations of radical rap and hip-hop artists, rebellious raconteur Scott-Heron proves here why is still considered one of the most outspoken artists of his generation. ~ Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide
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PostPosted: Today at 11:41 (2017)    Post subject: Gil Scott Heron "The revolution won't be televised" (1970) and after

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